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Does your horse need sun protection?

09 June 2016

Summer has come at last and horses with pink muzzles – or pink anywhere else – are prone to getting burnt. They will need some sun protection. Use a high factor cream, over 50 is good, and one that is baby-proof and water proof. This is less likely to cause reactions and will last a couple of days. Some horses are quite happy to be sun-creamed – and others hate it! Summer has come at last and horses with pink muzzles – or pink anywhere else – are prone to getting burnt. They will need some sun protection. Use a high factor cream, over 50 is good, and one that is baby-proof and water proof. This is less likely to cause reactions and will last a couple of days. Some horses are quite happy to be sun-creamed – and others hate it! Make things easier by spreading the sun cream across your palm first. This warms it up and you will cover a greater area with one wipe. Fine-coated horses with white socks will also need their heels protected with sun cream, too. Once burnt, they can become nastily infected and it is really hard to treat. Summer has come at last and horses with pink muzzles – or pink anywhere else – are prone to getting burnt. They will need some sun protection. Use a high factor cream, over 50 is good, and one that is baby-proof and water proof. This is less likely to cause reactions and will last a couple of days. Some horses are quite happy to be sun-creamed – and others hate it! For summer feeding advice call our Feed Line on 01728 604 008, email info@simplesystem.co.uk or complete an enquiry form on our website. Summer has come at last and horses with pink muzzles – or pink anywhere else – are prone to getting burnt. They will need some sun protection. Use a high factor cream, over 50 is good, and one that is baby-proof and water proof. This is less likely to cause reactions and will last a couple of days. Some horses are quite happy to be sun-creamed – and others hate it! Photo: Our Director of Nutrition Jane van Lennep taking a young horse out on his first Pleasure Ride in Harling Forest. Both horses are home bred for 6 generations.

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